Bladderbowel.gov.au

Department of Health

Health Professionals and Service Providers

With over 3.8 million Australians having had some form of incontinence, chances are that you may see someone every day with bladder or bowel problems. Bladder and bowel control problems can be a complicating factor in working with your clients. Although discussing these problems can be embarrassing for your client, it is important to bring the topic up. Incontinence can be treated, effectively managed and often cured.

The high risk groups for bladder and bowel control problems are:

  • Peri- and post-natal women
  • Younger women who have had children
  • Women who are overweight
  • People with diabetes, stroke, heart conditions, neurological disorders, recent surgery, respiratory conditions, and prostate problems

Talking to your clients

Talking about bladder and bowel control problems can be awkward for everyone involved. However, when your client tells you about their concerns, it is important to reassure them and help them to fully understand that:

  • They are not alone - bladder and bowel control problems are very common;
  • All age groups are affected, although it is more common amongst women, and older men;
  • Incontinence is not a simple condition - there are many different causes, such as pregnancy, childbirth, surgery, neurological and other disorders, menopause, prostate problems or some medicines or diet.

And most importantly let your client know that:

  • With proper assessment, bladder and bowel control problems can be treated, effectively managed and often cured.

If you feel you have nothing left to offer your client and you are thinking '… what now?' take a look at the brochure Helping Clients.

Resources

There are a number of brochures and factsheets that meet the needs of a diverse community and may be useful to your clients available for download:

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